A Roof Beam Scary Picture Story

NO! You Can't Just Stick A New Block On It . . .

This dry rot repair was so weak that it came apart in my hand. It may have looked great when it was originally done, but the dry rot repair of a roof beam cannot be only about looks. The additional cost of needing a second repair only adds to the problem.

Not With Dowels And Glue . . .

This dry rot repair will eventually be a headache for the homeowner — possibly in more ways than one. At least the cost of the rework will be less painful than being struck in the head when this block ultimately falls.

Not With Nails And Bolts . . .

An entire box of screws could have been used on this roof beam dry rot repair and the results would have been just as disappointing. Hiding decay behind a block is a lot like hiding the truth; in the end, it's only going to make things worse.

Not With Screws . . .

It really wouldn't matter what the cut-angle was on this roof beam dry rot repair — the outcome would still be the same. With this configuration, the rainwater shedding from the roof will channel directly into the joint between the roof beam and the block that was meant to repair it. This, unfortunately, amounts to roof beam failure on the installment plan — again.

Not At An Angle . . .

No matter how an exposed roof beam end is repaired, it must be done in such a way as to channel rainwater away. Water is the lifeblood of the dry rot fungus that creates roof beam decay. A well-conceived roof beam repair begins with this in mind. A wood roof beam restoration that takes on water is destined for the same fate as a wood boat that does; each will leave you with a sinking feeling...

Not With Nails And A Lag Bolt And At An Angle . . .

No Matter What Your Roof Beam Dry Rot Problems Are, This Is Not The Solution.

 

The End

(but not of your troubles with those rotten beams!)

Hover Text from images above:

Top Image: This dry rot repair was so weak that it came apart in my hand. It may have looked great when it was originally done, but the dry rot repair of a roof beam cannot be only about looks. The additional cost of needing a second repair only adds to the problem.

2nd Image: This dry rot repair will eventually be a headache for the homeowner — possibly in more ways than one. At least the cost of the rework will be less painful than being struck in the head when this block ultimately falls.

 

3rd Image: An entire box of screws could have been used on this roof beam dry rot repair and the results would have been just as disappointing. Hiding decay behind a block is a lot like hiding the truth; in the end, it's only going to make things worse.

 

4th Image: It really wouldn't matter what the cut-angle was on this roof beam dry rot repair — the outcome would still be the same. With this configuration, the rainwater shedding from the roof will channel directly into the joint between the roof beam and the block that was meant to repair it. This, unfortunately, amounts to roof beam failure on the installment plan — again.

 

Bottom Image: No matter how an exposed roof beam end is repaired, it must be done in such a way as to channel rainwater away. Water is the lifeblood of the dry rot fungus that creates roof beam decay. A well-conceived roof beam repair begins with this in mind. A wood roof beam restoration that takes on water is destined for the same fate as a wood boat that does; each will leave you with a sinking feeling...

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